Design Philosophy

What do you want to do next?

  • Modify or delete this article? The article list is the place to start.
  • Change this site’s name, or modify the style of the URLs? It’s all up to your preferences.
  • Get yourself acquainted with Textile, the humane markup generator which comes with Textpattern? The basics are simple. If you want to learn more, you can dig into an extensive manual later.
  • Be guided through your Textpattern first steps by completing some basic tasks?
  • Study the Textpattern Semantic Model?
  • Add another user, or extend the capabilities with third party plugins you discovered from the central plugin directory at Textpattern Resources?
  • Dive in and learn by trial and error? Then please note:
    • When you write an article you assign it to a section of your site.
    • Sections use a page template and a style as an output scaffold.
    • Page templates use HTML and Textpattern tags (like this: <txp:article />) to build the markup.
    • Some Textpattern tags use forms, which are building blocks for reusable snippets of code and markup you may build and use at your discretion.

There is a host of Frequently Asked Questions to help you get started.

Textpattern tags, their attributes and values are explained and sampled within the Textpattern User Documentation, where you will also find valuable tips and tutorials.

There’s also a crowd of friendly, helpful people over at the Textpattern support forum. Come and pay a visit!

Markdown Test

An h1 header

Paragraphs are separated by a blank line.

2nd paragraph. Italic, bold, and monospace. Itemized lists look like:

  • this one
  • that one
  • the other one

Note that --- not considering the asterisk --- the actual text content starts at 4-columns in.

Block quotes are written like so.

They can span multiple paragraphs, if you like.

Use 3 dashes for an em-dash. Use 2 dashes for ranges (ex., "it's all in chapters 12--14"). Three dots ... will be converted to an ellipsis. Unicode is supported. ☺

An h2 header

Here's a numbered list:

  1. first item
  2. second item
  3. third item

Note again how the actual text starts at 4 columns in (4 characters from the left side). Here's a code sample:

# Let me re-iterate ...
for i in 1 .. 10 { do-something(i) }

As you probably guessed, indented 4 spaces. By the way, instead of indenting the block, you can use delimited blocks, if you like:

define foobar() {
    print "Welcome to flavor country!";
}

(which makes copying & pasting easier). You can optionally mark the delimited block for Pandoc to syntax highlight it:

import time
# Quick, count to ten!
for i in range(10):
    # (but not *too* quick)
    time.sleep(0.5)
    print i

An h3 header

Now a nested list:

  1. First, get these ingredients:

    • carrots
    • celery
    • lentils
  2. Boil some water.

  3. Dump everything in the pot and follow this algorithm:

    find wooden spoon
    uncover pot
    stir
    cover pot
    balance wooden spoon precariously on pot handle
    wait 10 minutes
    goto first step (or shut off burner when done)

    Do not bump wooden spoon or it will fall.

Notice again how text always lines up on 4-space indents (including that last line which continues item 3 above).

Here's a link to a website, to a local doc, and to a section heading in the current doc. Here's a footnote 1.

Tables can look like this:

size material color


9 leather brown 10 hemp canvas natural 11 glass transparent

Table: Shoes, their sizes, and what they're made of

(The above is the caption for the table.) Pandoc also supports multi-line tables:


keyword text


red Sunsets, apples, and other red or reddish things.

green Leaves, grass, frogs and other things it's not easy being.


A horizontal rule follows.


Here's a definition list:

apples
Good for making applesauce. oranges
Citrus! tomatoes
There's no "e" in tomatoe.

Again, text is indented 4 spaces. (Put a blank line between each term/definition pair to spread things out more.)

Here's a "line block":

| Line one | Line too | Line tree

and images can be specified like so:

example image

Inline math equations go in like so: $\omega = d\phi / dt$. Display math should get its own line and be put in in double-dollarsigns:

$$I = \int \rho R^{2} dV$$

And note that you can backslash-escape any punctuation characters which you wish to be displayed literally, ex.: `foo`, *bar*, etc.


  1. Footnote text goes here. 

mkp_if_amp

mkp_if_amp

This conditional tag examines the url of the current page and determines if the url ends in ‘amp.’ This allows for a custom page to be rendered using the standards for Google’s Accelerated Mobile Pages Project.

Links

mkp_if_amp

Attributes

None

Examples

You will want some code similar to this in your individual article template header so that the amp page can be properly detected.


<txp:if_individual_article>
 <link rel="canonical" href="<txp:permlink />">
 <link rel="amphtml" href="<txp:permlink />/amp/">
</txp:if_individual_article>

You will want something similar to this in your individual article template to display the alternative formatting.


<txp:mkp_if_amp>
 <txp:output_form form="layout_archives_amp" />
<txp:else />
 <txp:output_form form="layout_archives_standard" />
</txp:_mkp_if_amp>

Release History

Version 1.0: March 24th, 2016

mkp_version

mkp_version

use to show the current version number.

Attributes: None

mkp_generator

use to show a meta name generator tag.

Attributes: None

mkp_if_version

A Conditional tag that compares the current version against a submitted value.

Attributes

version

Examples


<txp:mkp_version />

<txp:mkp_generator />

<txp:mkp_if_version version="4.6.2"><meta name="Textpattern" content="Current: <txp:mkp_version />" /><txp:else /><meta name="Textpattern" content="Classic: <txp:mkp_version >" ></txp:if_version>

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ {.html #example-1}

### Release History

Version 1.0: July 10th, 2015

Version 1.1: June 6th, 2016 (Updated 4.6 Tag Registry to later version)

Version 1.2: February 28th, 2017 (Bug fixes; add <txp:mkp_generator /> )